Read in between the lines

READING IN BETWEEN THE LINES

 

Looking at the diagram above,which part would you think is correct? Part A or part B? For part A we don’t need to argue much about that. If you wrote your answers as those in part A and the teacher marked you wrong you would even sue him for marking you wrong over something that is correct. We have grown up since nursery school knowing that part A is always correct.

What about part B? It may be wrong and right at the same time. It is right in such a way that there is a sequence/pattern being followed such that the first figure is picked followed by the second figure to form the answer.

Now what’s the essence of this diagram? The main aim of the examiner is to challenge the student. The examiners has to make sure that there is an A student and the C student. The difference between the A student and the C student is that the A student is able to read in between the lines and get what exactly the examiner is looking for while the C student settles for the most obvious questions.

The fact that you have always known 1+1=2 doesn’t mean that when the examiner brings 1+1=11 is wrong. What I mean here is for you to put yourself in the examiner’s shoe. Read in between the lines and get to know what exactly the examiner is looking for.

 

Looking at the diagram below:

 

What are the next two answers? Is 11 and 9 the correct answers? Yes they are very correct; but not correct in this case. A very different case from the very obvious addition we all know. Read in between the lines and get to know what the examiner is looking for.

Not every correct answer is correct. It is only correct if it goes hand in hand with what the examiner is looking for. Don’t be the C student always be the A student.